Cherry Bomb: On Dovie Beams and the Marcos Administration

Among all the mistresses that Pres. Ferdinand Marcos had, the name of American actress Dovie Beams stands out in public memory. The saucy details she shared of her two-year-long affair with the Philippine president, as well as the audio tapes containing their intimate conversations, have overshadowed her acting role in Ang Mga Maharlika, the 1968 … Continue reading Cherry Bomb: On Dovie Beams and the Marcos Administration

From Polarization to Pluralism: The Turn in Mojares’s Scholarship and Politics

Prof. Resil Mojares during a PostScript Interview, 1 August 2018 Prof. Resil Mojares, the Visayan Titan of Letters, is lauded for his contributions to history writing and Cebuano literature. His works reflect a deep investment in the intellectual and cultural development of the Filipino, evinced by his studies of regional history and his essays interrogating … Continue reading From Polarization to Pluralism: The Turn in Mojares’s Scholarship and Politics

Of the Same House: Mariano Ponce and the Pan-Asianist Alliance

Without a doubt, the Japanese occupation from 1942 to 1945 is one of the darkest times in Philippine history. But just a few decades prior to the invasion, the Japanese ardently supported Philippine independence from Spanish and American colonialism. They coordinated with ilustrado Mariano Ponce, “the First Philippine Republic’s representative to Japan,” for the transport … Continue reading Of the Same House: Mariano Ponce and the Pan-Asianist Alliance

On Filipino Time: Temporality and Materiality in Philippine History

Many Filipino thinkers have deplored Filipino time, a “bad national habit” characterized by tardiness. Their writings track the origins of this phenomenon and offer suggestions for curbing it. For Christian Jil R. Benitez, an instructor in the Department of Filipino at the Ateneo de Manila University, the expression came from the American occupation. American officials, … Continue reading On Filipino Time: Temporality and Materiality in Philippine History

Surviving the War of the Saints: San Vidal, the Obscure Patron Saint of Cebu

Image of San Vidal in Cebu Cathedral during 2011. Photo by Clodoveo Nacorda. Cebu City’s devotion to the Santo Niño is best captured by the vibrant Sinulog festival. Over a million visitors flock to the city every third Sunday of January to venerate the Holy Child, joining processions during the day and enjoying street parties … Continue reading Surviving the War of the Saints: San Vidal, the Obscure Patron Saint of Cebu